Isotope dating fossils tree ring dating and archaeology

In fact, this form of dating has been used to date the age of rocks brought back to Earth from the moon.

So, we see there are a number of different methods for dating rocks and other non-living things, but what if our sample is organic in nature?

For example, uranium-lead dating can be used to find the age of a uranium-containing mineral.

It works because we know the fixed radioactive decay rates of uranium-238, which decays to lead-206, and for uranium-235, which decays to lead-207.

Because plants use carbon dioxide for photosynthesis, this isotope ends up inside the plant, and because animals eat plants, they get some as well.

When a plant or an animal dies, it stops taking in carbon-14.

The methods work because radioactive elements are unstable, and they are always trying to move to a more stable state. This process by which an unstable atomic nucleus loses energy by releasing radiation is called radioactive decay.

The thing that makes this decay process so valuable for determining the age of an object is that each radioactive isotope decays at its own fixed rate, which is expressed in terms of its half-life.

There are different methods of radiometric dating that will vary due to the type of material that is being dated.

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These differing rates of decay help make uranium-lead dating one of the most reliable methods of radiometric dating because they provide two different decay clocks.

This provides a built-in cross-check to more accurately determine the age of the sample.

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However, rocks and other objects in nature do not give off such obvious clues about how long they have been around.

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