Teenage dating violence statistics

Additionally, a recent hearing regarding violent video games in the U. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce (2) has once again highlighted concerns over possible causes of teen violence.

Unfortunately, pinpointing the causes of teen violence is not as simple as pointing to a video game or taking away a gun.

Once an abusive partner has broken down the victim’s ability to trust their own perceptions, the victim is more likely to stay in the abusive relationship.

There are a variety of gaslighting techniques that an abusive partner might use: Withholding: the abusive partner pretends not to understand or refuses to listen. “I don’t want to hear this again,” or “You’re trying to confuse me.” Countering: the abusive partner questions the victim’s memory of events, even when the victim remembers them accurately. “You’re wrong, you never remember things correctly.” Blocking/Diverting: the abusive partner changes the subject and/or questions the victim’s thoughts. “Is that another crazy idea you got from [friend/family member]?

Some of the more common reasons for acting out involve modeling behaviors.

If teens see violence at home, in the movies, in video games, or on the street, they are more inclined to copy such behaviors (3).

Over time, however, these abusive patterns continue and a victim can become confused, anxious, isolated, and depressed, and they can lose all sense of what is actually happening.

Then they start relying on the abusive partner more and more to define reality, which creates a very difficult situation to escape.

While findings of teen dating violence rates based on gender remain inconsistent, research suggests that girls seem to suffer disproportionately from severe violence in relationships (i.e., physical and sexual assault).There are many causes of teen violence, and most teen violence takes place without guns, in the form of fights and bullying away from school (1).Why teens become violent There are several theories as to why teens act out in violence.Others, who experience bullying or teasing, become enraged enough to begin acting out in revenge. Lashing out in response to what has been seen or experienced does not account for all instances of teen violence, however.According to the Centers for Disease Control, teen violence can also be caused by frustration due to learning disorders, emotional distress, or attention deficits (1).

Search for teenage dating violence statistics:

teenage dating violence statistics-3

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

One thought on “teenage dating violence statistics”